Peking Mukden Railway Photograph Collection. PEKING MUKDEN RAILWAY PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION.
Peking Mukden Railway Photograph Collection.
Peking Mukden Railway Photograph Collection.
Peking Mukden Railway Photograph Collection.
Peking Mukden Railway Photograph Collection.
Peking Mukden Railway Photograph Collection.
Peking Mukden Railway Photograph Collection.
Peking Mukden Railway Photograph Collection.
Peking Mukden Railway Photograph Collection.
Peking Mukden Railway Photograph Collection.
Peking Mukden Railway Photograph Collection.
Peking Mukden Railway Photograph Collection.

Peking Mukden Railway Photograph Collection.

No place of publication. No details of publisher. (circa1910). Stock ID #160684

Collection of eight black and white photgraphs featuring some models of trains operated on the Peking Mukden Railway or Jingfeng Railway at their terminus. The edges of two photographs have closed tears, a very interesting group in good condition. Each photo measures 21.6 x 28.6cm. The majority of the steam engines shown in the photographs are known as MG models (MG型) by the Chinese, which are also known as the "Mogul" class by westerners. One of the steam engines seems likely to be the model DB4. The reporting numbers of the trains can be identified on the bumpers when looked at under magnification. They are shown as a two-digit Arabic number on the left with the corresponding number in traditional Chinese characters on the right. The reporting numbers of the trains in the photos are: 8 捌, 17 拾柒, 18拾捌, 20 貳拾, 21貳拾壹, 31叁拾壹, 32叁貳, 65陸五. No. 8 was a 2-6-2 saddle tank engine ordered from Sharp Stewart & Co. in 1887 ( 16 years before its amalgation with Dubs & Neilson Reid to form North British Loco Co.) 17,20,& 21 are Dubs 2-6-0 of 1892 and 31 similar but 1895. 65 is an American Baldwin version of a 2-6-0 dating 1899, with a taller chimney & two domes.

Class MG1 was an industrial steam engine constructed in 1908/1909, a product of a joint venture by the North British Locomotive Company and CRRC Tangshan, a manufacturer located in Hebei Province. This train operated on the Jingsui Ry., which is Peking−Guisui (Hohhot), now part of the Beijing–Baotou Railway. The revised name designation for these engines is MG (MG-MG7 variations were produced). The MG1 was operative in China until it was decommissioned from service in 1990.

Class DB4 was built in 1892 by Dübs & Company (a UK company which later merged with the above North British Locomotive Company) and operated on the Peking-Mukden Railway. Information pertaining to these two classes is limited, as trains such as these which were for industrial usage were typically overlooked as recorded early history of trains in China paid far more attention to the more glamorous passenger train engines which operated all over China. Regional workhorse trains such as these barely received any attention. However, as both trains operated on railroads connected to Peking, we can assume that the location of the train sheds in the photographs must be somewhere near to a station in Peking.

Before 1949, due to the lack of technology and a large amount of social turmoil, China heavily relied on imported steam trains. These trains were the products of 9 countries and more than 30 manufacturers including: Baldwin Locomotive Works (US), Fives Lille (France), Hannoversche locomotives (Germany), North British Locomotive Company (UK) and Hitachi (Japan).

The construction for Peking Mukden Railway which eventually ran to 840 kilometres, was started in 1877 by the imperial Qing government. The first section of the railway, one of China's earliest railways, was finished in 1881 and was only 9.7 Kilometres long. This section operated between Tangshan [唐山] and Suigezhuang [胥各庄] and was mainly used for transporting coal. Over the next 30 years, the railway extended section by section from Peking, the capital of the Qing Empire to the alternative capital Mukden (the Manchu name for Fengtian "mandated by Heaven" and changed into its modern name Shenyang at the end of WWII). From 1912 to 1929, P.K.R was in full operation and was one of China's busiest railways. Its name was changed twice: to Beining Railway in 1929 and Jingshen Railway after 1949. (When referring to this item please quote stockid 160684).

Price: $1,600.00 AU

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