Asia Bookroom's Book Club

Asia Bookroom runs a book group! Join a friendly, informal group of people interested in reading and discussing books of Asian interest.
 
When Does the Group Meet?
Book group members meet every 6 - 8 weeks at Asia Bookroom's premises in Macquarie in Belconnen. We welcome new members.
 

What Types of Books Does the Group Read?

Asia Book Group reads a wide variety of books on all parts of Asia. The books are chosen by the group and might be fiction or non fiction, literary or popular - all of them have in common interesting Asia related themes and ideas which are ideal for discussion. From time to time we are privileged to have the author present.

The list of the books we are reading this year together with dates of this year's meetings can be found below.

Who Can Join?

Everyone is welcome. We know how daunting it can be to join a new group but rest assured everyone is welcome in our friendly group. We really value everyone's input - the more disparate the views the more interesting. Members come from a variety of different backgrounds and include people who have travelled or lived in Asia, people with an Asian family background, people who have studied an Asian language or culture, as well as people who have never left Australia but are interested in reading and discussing something different! The group size varies from time to time but usually about 15 - 20 people attend a meeting.

Does It Cost to Belong?

No, there is no charge to belong to the group but we do ask that you buy the book group book from Asia Bookroom. The good news is that book group members receive a 10% discount on all book group books.

When Does Asia Book Group Meet?

Our meetings are held between 6pm and 7.30pm on a Thursday every 6 - 8 weeks but can occasionally vary from this. At the foot of this page you will see the names of the forthcoming books and the dates we will be meeting to discuss them.

I Am Not Sure That I Can Attend Every Meeting - Does This Matter? No it doesn't matter, you are welcome to come as regularly or irregularly as you like. We understand that members' lives are busy and we welcome you when you can come but understand when you can't. RSVPs for seating and refreshment purposes are appreciated but not essential.

How Do I Know What Books to Read and the Date of the Next Meeting? Contact Asia Bookroom by email books@AsiaBookroom.com or phone 6251 5191. Our book Group email list which you are now subscribed to will keep you up-to-date with book details and meeting dates.

 

Home – Leila Chudori

Thursday October 19, 2017 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Please note change of date for this meeting - it is now on Thursday October 19th!

"Night had fallen, without complaint, without pretext. Like a black net enclosing the city, ink from a monster squid spreading across Jakarta's entire landscape-the color of my uncertain future."  

So begins the novel "Home" ("Pulang") and Leila S Chudori's remarkable fictional account of the impact of the September 30 Movement of 1965. This "movement," blamed by military leaders on the Indonesian Communist Party, led to the murder of a million or more presumed Communists and the imprisonment of tens of thousands presumed leftists and sympathizers. Thousands of Indonesian citizens who were abroad at the time had their passports revoked and were left to live in exile. Thereafter, history was manipulated by the Soeharto government to portray its involvement in this atrocity in a favorable light. A whole generation of Indonesians was raised in world of forced silence, where facts were suppressed and left unspoken.  

While the tumultuous events of 1965 are the backdrop of the story, "Home" is not a novel about ideology or political power. Going back and forth, both temporally and geographically, between Jakarta and Paris in 1965 and 1998, "Home" is about the lives of the Indonesian exiles, their families and friends, including those left behind in Indonesia. This story is one of love, lust, and betrayal but one that also includes laughter, adventure and food.

"Night had fallen, without complaint, without pretext. Like a black net enclosing the city, ink from a monster squid spreading across Jakarta's entire landscape-the color of my uncertain future."  

So begins the novel "Home" ("Pulang") and Leila S Chudori's remarkable fictional account of the impact of the September 30 Movement of 1965. This "movement," blamed by military leaders on the Indonesian Communist Party, led to the murder of a million or more presumed Communists and the imprisonment of tens of thousands presumed leftists and sympathizers. Thousands of Indonesian citizens who were abroad at the time had their passports revoked and were left to live in exile. Thereafter, history was manipulated by the Soeharto government to portray its involvement in this atrocity in a favorable light. A whole generation of Indonesians was raised in world of forced silence, where facts were suppressed and left unspoken.  

While the tumultuous events of 1965 are the backdrop of the story, "Home" is not a novel about ideology or political power. Going back and forth, both temporally and geographically, between Jakarta and Paris in 1965 and 1998, "Home" is about the lives of the Indonesian exiles, their families and friends, including those left behind in Indonesia. This story is one of love, lust, and betrayal but one that also includes laughter, adventure and food."Night had fallen, without complaint, without pretext. Like a black net enclosing the city, ink from a monster squid spreading across Jakarta's entire landscape-the color of my uncertain future." So begins the novel "Home" ("Pulang") and Leila S Chudori's remarkable fictional account of the impact of the September 30 Movement of 1965. This "movement," blamed by military leaders on the Indonesian Communist Party, led to the murder of a million or more presumed Communists and the imprisonment of tens of thousands presumed leftists and sympathizers. Thousands of Indonesian citizens who were abroad at the time had their passports revoked and were left to live in exile. Thereafter, history was manipulated by the Soeharto government to portray its involvement in this atrocity in a favorable light. A whole generation of Indonesians was raised in world of forced silence, where facts were suppressed and left unspoken. While the tumultuous events of 1965 are the backdrop of the story, "Home" is not a novel about ideology or political power. Going back and forth, both temporally and geographically, between Jakarta and Paris in 1965 and 1998, "Home" is about the lives of the Indonesian exiles, their families and friends, including those left behind in Indonesia. This story is one of love, lust, and betrayal but one that also includes laughter, adventure and food. - See more at: http://www.asiabookroom.com/pages/books/155988/leila-s-chudori-john-h-mcglynn/home#sthash.oaVIx0F4.dpuf

Bones of the Dark Moon – Richard E. Lewis

Thursday December 7, 2017 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

During construction on an idyllic Bali seashore, workers uncover skeletons, victims of brutal mass murder. The discovery sets the village of Batu Gede astir. The life of Made "Nol" Ziro, a stalwart member of the community with a little gambling problem, is turned upside down. Could one of those skeletons be that of his schoolmaster father, who disappeared during the massacres of 1965? As Nol sets out to find the truth, his path crosses that of American anthropologist Tina Briddle, who has secrets of her own, and who is determined to give a voice to the unknown bones. She suspects that the key to their mystery lies with Reed Davis, an enigmatic retiree dwelling among the Ubud expat community and rumored to have been a CIA spy. Drawing them together is the mysterious Luhde Srikandi, who fifty years ago whispered her enchantments from the shadows of conspiracy and who begins to whisper again. What happened on that sleepy beach isn't all dusty memory. Secrets are revealed, vengeance is unleashed, and a forbidden love flares to life. Arguably the most traumatic cataclysm of Bali's rich and fascinating history, the massacres of 1965 remain mostly unknown to the island's visitors. Interweaving historical drama with contemporary Bali life, Bones of the New Moon is compulsively readable, a page-turner with unexpected twists leavened with dashes of humor, laying bare the love and hatred, the tragedy and irony, and the joy and despair of our common human predicament.

We have read well over 70 books since the book group began.